[[fester:shares_basic]]

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fester:shares_basic [2017/06/19 11:07]
admin [Share Creation and Configuration]
fester:shares_basic [2017/06/19 11:18] (current)
admin [Windows Client Configuration]
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 The client computer will now reboot, when it does log back into the FreeNAS GUI. The client computer will now reboot, when it does log back into the FreeNAS GUI.
 +
 +==== Enable CIFS/SMB Service ====
 +
 +Now go to the "​Services"​ page.
 +
 +{{:​fester:​91f9c957b109e4f4bd41d2f8a69e1a6c.png}}
 +
 +Turn on the CIFS share service.
 +
 +{{:​fester:​9c896640f45eb78c4ba4c574a172a198.png}}
 +
 +Give the server some time to get the share up and running, then it is time to map the network folder to a drive letter.
 +
 +==== Mapping the share to a drive letter ====
 +
 +On the Windows client click on the “Start” button and go into “Computer” (this was on a Windows 7 machine).
 +
 +This should bring up a window that shows all the hard drives and any other devices connected to the Windows computer.
 +
 +Click on the “Map Network Drive” button.
 +
 +{{:​fester:​ad8674121658f676c199d1522feae02f.png}}
 +
 +From the “Drive:​” drop down selection box (1) chose the drive letter you wish to assign to the shared folder (Fester accepted the default **Z** letter).
 +
 +Now click the “Browse…” button (2).
 +
 +This will cause a window to pop up.
 +
 +Navigate to the location of the shared folder by clicking on the server (in this case TestNAS1) (3) and then clicking on the shared folder itself (in this case Fester’s TestShare) (4).
 +
 +Now click the “OK” button (5).
 +
 +The shared folder’s path name should appear in the “Folder:​” text box (6).
 +
 +Tick the “Reconnect at logon” Tick box (7).
 +
 +Now click the “Finish” button (8).
 +
 +{{:​fester:​6a37b15c4f92514567c5cce73bf14fad.png}}
 +
 +{{:​fester:​4498ea47a21b30f4956d1f1715388dd7.png}}
 +
 +At this point another window will pop up and ask you for the username and password for the share.
 +
 +The name of the server is shown next to the text at the top of the window (1).
 +
 +Type in your username in the first text box (2) (in Fester’s case this was **TestUser**).
 +
 +Now type in your password in the second text box (3) (in Fester’s case this was **test**).
 +
 +If you don’t want to type in your username and password exact time you log into your client machine then tick the “Remember my credentials” tick box (4).
 +
 +Now click the “OK” button (5).
 +
 +{{:​fester:​ae6daec7c9a542646db78245c8133142.png}}
 +
 +If all has gone well you should find yourself in the shared folder. Here you can create other folders and save files. Test this to make sure there are no permissions problems.
 +
 +The shared folder will now appear as another drive on your system and should look something like this.
 +
 +{{:​fester:​aa3ccd5f757d3220edf0042cb21196f3.png}}
 +
 +That’s the starter share done.
 +
 +If you want to play with the permissions for this share then feel free. It is the only real way to learn about these things.
 +
 +Remember the permissions for a share on Windows clients are in two parts.
 +
 +Part one is the “Share” permissions and part two is “NTFS” permissions.
 +
 +==== Share Permissions ====
 +
 +“Share” permissions relate to the permissions of the actual shared folder on the server.
 +
 +Be very careful changing these. The FreeNAS GUI will stop you making most catastrophic changes to the permissions that would otherwise break the share.
 +
 +However, if you go behind the GUI to the command prompt you could really mess things up. Do not use the **chmod** command here or you will probably break the share. Use the **getfacl** and **setfacl** commands.
 +
 +Another way you can alter the “Share” permissions is by using an application that runs on the client specifically for this purpose. I have not used any of these programs so I cannot comment on how useful or easy they are to use. However, you still need to be careful when using them because you are still going behind the FreeNAS GUI here.
 +
 +==== NTFS Permissions ====
 +
 +“NTFS” permissions relate to the permissions you set for the shared folder on the client side through the Windows OS.
 +
 +It is considered good practice (this is debateable) to leave the “Share” permissions as they are and lock down the share using NTFS permissions. This has the advantage of controlling the share regardless of how it is accessed (i.e. locally or via a network).
 +
 +It is much easier for the beginner and those that are unfamiliar with Linux or FreeBSD to configure permissions in this way as the permissions are controlled by a series of tick boxes (not cryptic commands). As long as you understand what each of the settings mean you should be fine.
 +
 +However, be careful as it is possible using the “Everyone” group to lock yourself out of the share (Fester did this and could not regain control of the share).
  
  
  • fester/shares_basic.txt
  • Last modified: 2017/06/19 11:18
  • by admin